Win10 + Fedora25

2016-Dec-14, Wednesday 09:51 pm
chebe: (StepIntoTheLight)
Golly gosh gawd darn. I just learned me some things.

I just dual-booted my new(ish) Windows 10 laptop with Fedora 25.
The usual process applies;
- shrink Windows partition using Windows own tool in Disk Management
- create nifty live usb (from new live usb creating program from Fedora)
- boot into live usb

(An aside; in order for the boot menu (F12) to be accessible/work, first I had to go into the BIOS (F2) and enable the boot menu.)

- inside live usb, install to hard disk (Fedora handles all the details, just point it at the empty space)

Then things have gotten a little bit different. No messing with boot sectors, no dd, no MBR editing, no bcdedit. You reboot, and things just work.

(Another aside; Except, when they don't. I tried many things, but it seems I needed to go back into my BIOS, set a Supervisor Password. This unlocked the Secure Boot menu, which allowed me to add a trusted image. Follow the menus down through Fedora to grubx64.efi, and select. Save and exit. Go back into BIOS, to the boot menu order, grub will now be in the list, make it goes to the top of the list. Save and exit.)

On boot you will be greeted with the grub menu; offering you Fedora, or to go to the Windows Boot Menu.

Happy days. I'm dual-booted again!

(On the plus side; everything just seems to work in Fedora 25! From the wlan, to the touch screen, it just, it's beautiful. *wipes tear away*)
chebe: (HandAgainstGlass)
This weekend involved getting to see Placebo in concert, so not much else happened. But that's the great thing about software, you can be productive without getting out of bed.

I recently attended a Quantified Self meetup on sleep, that gave me the kick up the arse I've been needing. (Which was only compounded when I heard about Pebble closing, and that Fitbit would take over their servers, and staff.) One of the presenters talked about how he got his Fitbit data and how he analysed it. (If you're interested, slides are here, and blog post here.) He switched to using the official APIs when they became available, but I went with his original approach, a python program to log in and get your intraday data points instead of the aggregated stuff you get on the dashboard.

I haven't been the most steady wearable user, but there were a few months when I wore it reliably. Simply because I was sleeping terribly and wanted to understand just how badly. Although I never got around to actually analaysing the data, until now. (That's one thing about all these QS talks, typically everyone showing their data is the picture of good health. I'm more interested in seeing what it looks like when it goes wrong.)

I used the website dashboard to find the months that actually contained data. Then I exported csv files, month-by-month, using the official export option. This is the aggregated information, but it will be nice to see if it correlates with the intraday info.

Then armed with dates that contain valid data, I put them into the python program, and grabbed all my data. In short, download and extract the source code. In the same folder as setup.py create your own python file, where you will create your own client. (This information is apparently in the example files, but I poked around before I noticed that.) To create your own client you just pass in your email address and password;
client = fitbit.Client.login(email="bob@example.com", password="password")
You grab the specific info you're interested in;
client.intraday_sleep(date)
And then dump it to screen/file/whatever you want. Although it's a good idea to format it a little.

Sleep data is recorded as one value per minute.

# The different values for sleep are:
# 0: no sleep data
# 1: asleep
# 2: awake
# 3: very awake

# data will be a similar list of tuples, but spaced one minute apart
# [
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 20, 23, 59), 2),
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 21, 0, 0), 1),
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 21, 0, 1), 1),
# ....
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 21, 8, 34), 1),
# ]


And then, we are left with the task of analysing the data. Which is a much bigger one.

Sewing miscellaneous

2016-Dec-05, Monday 02:16 pm
chebe: (WhoWouldHaveThought?)
No make to report this week. But the past couple of weeks I've been on an organisational binge. It started with getting the Colette Sewing Planner. It not only enabled me to collect all my projects and notes in one place (that conveniently fits in my handbag), but it also forced me to think about what it is I actually wear, and what I want to focus on.

But of course, it only lead onto other undertakings; like sorting all my patterns (upgrading to clear envelopes because I had a right pain opening up all the opaque ones when looking for the right pattern), and finally taking on sorting through my fabric stash. Every length is now measured and tagged. ... But then, I figured it would be beneficial to create my own swatch book. So I found a PDF template, customised it, and now I've sent it off to get printed on some nice card stock.

I've also ordered a bunch of needles I'm missing (like twin stretch), some nifty tools (like twin pattern wheel), and some new cases/boxes to help me tidy up my overflowing sewing box. It's a deep rabbit hole, but I think I'm close to the end. And I've rediscovered quite the collection of projects that I already have all the fabric and thread for, so hopefully I'll be able to tackle the really long list swiftly. ... Oh, ribbons and elastics! ... Tidying up, who knew it was so helpful?
chebe: (Spools of thread)
This weekend I began the journey towards trousers. I'm taking the long route, so I started with some pull-on knit shorts. Simplicity 1429, view E; long (knee-length) shorts, with acres of material. I can't quite figure out why this pattern is knit-only. Nothing stretches (except the elastic wasitband). I could have made this in a lightweight non-stretch woven and only the drape would have been affected.

Otherwise though, cute lounge shorts. There are soft pleats in the front, darts in the back, and a blind hem, of which I will only say that I need more practice. A lot more.

I also added the waistband to the wrong side, and had to unpick it. A narrow zigzag stretch stitch on a thin rayon. It took a very long time. And then, I put it back on inside out, and could not face unpicking it again. Most people don't go around inspecting each others wasitbands though, so it should be okay.

I made it in a featherweight jersey called Fushia Dakota knit, 95% rayon/5% spandex. (Which made machining the blind hem extra fun.) Comfy, light; I can see the full length trousers working well in hot weather.

Loungey )
chebe: (GirlDayDreaming)
This weekends make was Seamwork's Oslo; an oversized, slightly boxy, long cardigan. I made it in a Medium, and there is still oodles of room there. Definitely comfy.

I left off the buttons. And went with sleeve option 2 (the non roll-up kind) because when working with computers I find it easier to have my wrists accessory free. Although they are still long enough to cover the knuckles. I did have the seam ripper out for this one. It took me way too long to understand the cuff instructions. (Turn half inside-out to right side out.)

I made it in a nice polyester Ponte de Roma (quickly becoming my favourite fabric) with just a touch of spandex (4%). The colour is officially 'Petrol', which is like a darker, more blue teal? I'm pretty sure it will go with almost everything in my wardrobe.

Slouchy )
chebe: (Sewing Machine)
Seamwork's Aberdeen is a v-neck, batwing sleeve, t-shirt. The front is one piece, so no need to worry about matching patterns. The back is two pieces, and also features a v-neck, which I think is a nice touch.

I need to practice adding v-necks. There's a little bubble at the front point, and the back ones didn't quite line up. Also, because I hate hemming, I half-assed the hem with just a single turn and zig-zag stitch.

But, it's cute and comfy. I made it up in a light t-shirt weight stretch jersey. I picked up this fabric as a remnant while on holiday in Vancouver years back. The print is busy, but monochromatic, so sufficiently moody for my tastes.

Ta-da! )
chebe: (Spools of thread)
Version one were made up in the green-blue spotty fabric. I told you you'd seen the last of that fabric, and I meant it. This version is done up in a plain plum-purple, medium weight stretch jersey. Otherwise; I tweaked the pattern to widen the calves, and take out some fabric from the stomach.

These are deliciously comfortable. The lower legs fit great. This material is less stretchy than version one, so has shown that adding a bit of length to the rear would be good as well. Next time Gadget.

Couple of pictures )
chebe: (Sewing Machine)
I'm feeling a little despondent over things I have no influence over. So I'm distracting myself with blogging. Here's something I made earlier in the year.

Remember the Butterick 6031 slip sew-along? (Here's version one.) Well, I finally got around to making it up in the kit fabric and notions.

It's straight forward, easy to put together (even with the slippery fabric). The lace straps are a little fiddly, but otherwise it's a joy to make and wear.

Photos )

4x4x4 LED Shield

2016-Aug-15, Monday 09:32 pm
chebe: (WalkSign)
You know the story; you go into Maplins for solder, and you walk out with an LED Cube Shield. (It can't be just me.) Anyway, building one of these yokes seems to have become a kind of rite of passage for the makery sort. So, I made one!

Couple of photos )



Not so straight LED Cube, completed
Photo by chebe



Pretty!

EMF 2016

2016-Aug-10, Wednesday 10:46 pm
chebe: (Default)
EMF happened last weekend. I went, with some of the tog people, but not with tog. It was a really good weekend.

It's difficult for me to describe what EMF is. Because it is simply too big now. There was somewhere between 1,000 and 1,500 people, camped in one large field. With five stages, several workshop tents, villages, bars, food vendors, and a giant beanbag-filled lounge tent. Every person attending will have had different experiences, some even seeming to be from completely different events. It's large. There's a lot on. And it's utterly surreal.

If you've been to any of the maker faires, then EMF can be described (as one of the other attendees said) as a large faire, only instead of explaining your ideas and projects to regular people you're showing them off to other makers and hackers. There's a level of engagement, of enthusiasm, of sheer energy, that is difficult to gather in other places. It's a bit like a temporary Never Never Land, full of grown-up techie toys, organised and run entirely by volunteers. Large inflated bunny filled with neopixel strips that you can change the colour of by tweeting it. Really tall LED tower game. Pong made physical, with giant paddles and fire. A podium that made fire dance to music beats. Bbqs, fire pits, self tending bar robot. Amazing micropython badges. An incredible wifi network with over 64 access points, a beautiful dashboard, and nearly two terabytes of data transmitted. Electricity to your tent. Hot sunny days, clear starry nights.

Reality is proving just how hard an act EMF is to follow.

You can check out photos, and watch the talks. It will give you a flavour, but it isn't the same as being there.

An aside )

It was a replenishing weekend. Fun, energising, and completely exhausting. I want to go back.
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