chebe: (OnTheVergeOfSomethingWonderful)
2017-02-26 06:24 pm
Entry tags:

Open Theremin V3

Gather:
- active/powered speakers with a 3.5mm stereo audio jack (bonus points if the power plug is grounded)
- camera tripod
- Arduino Uno, from wherever it has been gathering dust (and USB/power cable)

Acquire:
- Open Theremin Arduino Shield
- 1m of aluminium round tube; 6mm external thickness, 1mm wall thickness, 4mm internal diameter, from your local hardware shop

Do:
- Cut tube in half, and bend (or get bent) each half into the shape described in the diagram
- Solder shield together. (The button and LEDs are surface mounted. I scorched a leg pad of the yellow LED, so no blinky yellow for me.)
- Program Uno
- Plug all the bits together. The whole lot should be grounded, but both my speakers, and the Arduino, are powered over USB, and I could not find an earthed USB-converter plug. So, at the moment, they are plugged into my laptop, which is plugged into the mains. (There is a ground pad on the shield that I should hook up in future.)
- Power up, leave to warm up, trigger auto-calibration
- Make ALL THE NOISE



Theremin!
Photo by chebegeek



- Start band
chebe: (Default)
2017-01-18 04:17 pm
Entry tags:

(no subject)

You may have noticed a lack of updates. That's mainly because finding, and updating, all the image links in my blog takes a very, very long time. Did you realise I've had this blog nearly eight years? I certainly didn't.

In other news, I'm falling down the Quantified Self rabbit hole. I'd like to have a blog to reflect it. So that's another project on the backburner.
chebe: (OlympusCamera)
2017-01-06 02:58 am
Entry tags:

Backing-up my LJ ScrapBook pics, redux

You are Good People, right? You just want to get what's yours (albeit in the laziest way possible), right? You don't want to misuse any tools to cause any damage, right? Okay, great, listen up.

A while back I came up with some cmd line calls using wget to back up my LJ Scrapbook. This method stopped working as LJ restructured Scrapbook a few times. Me, I kept using them as free image hosting. But, for some reason, I've been remotivated to get a backup.

They use Flash. Flash does not play nice with, well, anything. So I am left with the not so elegant brute-force approach.

Log in to LJ. Go to your Scrapbook, view a photo, click on the little share icon. Grab your $usernumber.
Format:
http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/$username/$usernumber/$photonumber/$photonumber_original.jpg
Have a look at your newest upload, note the $photonumber.

While logged in, export your cookies.txt (see previous post, basically find plugin for your browser).
Plug $username, $usernumber, and a number greater than the $photonumber into $maxphotonumber.

Run script.

#!/bin/bash
username=your_user_name
usernumber=your_user_number
maxphotonumber=your_max_number
for (( c=0; c<=$maxphotonumber; c++))
do
wget --load-cookies cookies.txt -erobots=off -nd -np -r http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/$username/$usernumber/$c/"$c"_original.jpg
done


The script simply checks every single number between zero and your maximum number. If there exists an image, it will save it, with the same name. It only checks for the _original images. It saves everything in the one directory. It is not optimised, but it should get everything. Most of the flags aren't needed. But I think they show well just how much patience I lost with this whole thing.

*edit* About 14 hours to get over 1,000 pictures in a 280,000 number range.

*edit2* If you get a few unopenable files, try different format extensions.
chebe: (Default)
2017-01-02 12:08 pm
Entry tags:

33C3

Congress is an experience. Having an Assembly to hang around is a major plus. Like other conventions, the main purpose seems to be meeting up with people you don't get to see every often. (And complaining about how tired you are.) There were enchanting displays all over the place. I'm sure I didn't even manage to see everything. It never really stopped either. There was dancing in the snowglobe at 6am. There was hanging out in the sci-fi console area of the purpose-built-technically-outside lounge at 7am. I still haven't quite got the hang of the toilet and elevator parties. I wish I'd been well enough to do more, see more. But I certainly have ideas for next time.



Congress; 8am Day 4
Photo by chebegeek

chebe: (Default)
2016-12-26 10:40 pm
Entry tags:

33C3; day zero

Agent chebe reporting from 33C3; day zero. Although I've been to hacker camps before, like OHM and EMF, this is my first Congress. Plus side; no tents. Negative; hotel is far away, and there's winter rain. We got our wristbands, set up the Assembly next to the lovely Scottish Consulate. Got on the wifi. You know, the essentials. Had a quick look around as people were setting up. It already looks amazing, I'm sure tomorrow will permanently warp my sense of reality. I am a bit worried about how crowded it will be. 13,000 people, one venue. But there is that feel in the air, the one of creative minds working away.

P.S. I am probably Patient Zero.
chebe: (Wild)
2016-12-21 01:29 pm
Entry tags:

Apollo, In Place, and Dublin

So this thing is happening. A large, ugly, derelict, office block called Apollo House was taken over by squatters five days ago. But not ordinary squatters. These people have turned the building into a homeless shelter. Many internationally known musicians and actors are supportive, some actively taking part. It was announced on the largest, oldest, talk-show we have (clip on twitter). They are clearly owning that it is an 'act of civil disobedience'.

Brief background; Ireland's property market collapsed in 2008/2009, like many other places. A 'bad bank', NAMA (National Assets Management Agency) was set up to take on the bad debts of the other banks we were bailing out. It's still around. Initially it was sitting on its portfolio to avoid flooding the market with incredibly cheap property, and further destabilising the economy. But now it's sitting on it until the properties become valuable again. Until then all these properties are empty. During the largest homelessness problem we've ever had as a nation.

As was to be expected, they got the letter to vacate the premises, and are in court today. The Government says there are enough beds for all the homeless. Clearly they haven't walked through Dublin after 7pm recently.

An aside; soup kitchens have been popping up all over the city. They are always extremely busy. But the mobile sort, with no permanent premises. I saw a sign at the beginning of the year on one building; 'Soup Kitchen opening June", then July, then August, then soon, and still there's nothing.

The activists are maintaining that since we, the taxpayers, bailed out the banks, bought those bad loans, that those buildings belong to us, the people. That having them vacant, and crumbling, while people die on the streets in winter is a disgrace.

In some ways it's complicated. The use of nationalist language, and involvement of nationalist groups, worries me especially. But at the end of the day, 30 homeless people have had somewhere to sleep this past week. That is a good.

What I don't see mentioned is that Apollo House is right beside the literally-falling-apart building of the Department of Health. Which I think is just a beautiful irony.

Also, across the narrow one-way street, is another initiative. In Place. It's a collective of artists, doing things in a very hackerspace way. They are temporarily using the building, partly fixing it up, and have been for a few months now. The difference being, they did it with the permission of the landlord.

There is a lot of empty space around Dublin, people have been building maps of it. There's an app in the Android store that allows you to point your phone at a building and the app overlays if it is owned by NAMA. Meanwhile Dublin is heading into another property bubble, with record high rents, and little to no protection for renters.

It's all very interesting. Something is changing.
chebe: (Sewing Machine)
2016-12-19 11:55 am
Entry tags:

Knickers!; Stretch knickers

With the chalky taste of paracetamol in the back of my throat, there's only a small make this weekend. Or should I say, smalls?

I got a book recently, Knickers!, although 'book' is a bit of an exaggeration. There's a quick intro, and then it's straight in to instructions on how to make six (although three distinct) varieties of knickers. Then in the back there are patterns you need to enlarge 200%, or you can download the fullsize patterns from a website and print them (at 70+ A4 pages). Size charts are in UK dress sizes, not measurements. But otherwise, it is beautifully to-the-point, and very clear.

I used some left-over Fushia jersey, about two metres of black stretch lace, and took on the 'Stretch Knickers' pattern. Start to finish in an hour. I'll definitely be making more.

Couple of photos )
chebe: (StepIntoTheLight)
2016-12-14 09:51 pm
Entry tags:

Win10 + Fedora25

Golly gosh gawd darn. I just learned me some things.

I just dual-booted my new(ish) Windows 10 laptop with Fedora 25.
The usual process applies;
- shrink Windows partition using Windows own tool in Disk Management
- create nifty live usb (from new live usb creating program from Fedora)
- boot into live usb

(An aside; in order for the boot menu (F12) to be accessible/work, first I had to go into the BIOS (F2) and enable the boot menu.)

- inside live usb, install to hard disk (Fedora handles all the details, just point it at the empty space)

Then things have gotten a little bit different. No messing with boot sectors, no dd, no MBR editing, no bcdedit. You reboot, and things just work.

(Another aside; Except, when they don't. I tried many things, but it seems I needed to go back into my BIOS, set a Supervisor Password. This unlocked the Secure Boot menu, which allowed me to add a trusted image. Follow the menus down through Fedora to grubx64.efi, and select. Save and exit. Go back into BIOS, to the boot menu order, grub will now be in the list, make it goes to the top of the list. Save and exit.)

On boot you will be greeted with the grub menu; offering you Fedora, or to go to the Windows Boot Menu.

Happy days. I'm dual-booted again!

(On the plus side; everything just seems to work in Fedora 25! From the wlan, to the touch screen, it just, it's beautiful. *wipes tear away*)
chebe: (HandAgainstGlass)
2016-12-12 11:25 am

Quantified Self and Fitbit sleep data

This weekend involved getting to see Placebo in concert, so not much else happened. But that's the great thing about software, you can be productive without getting out of bed.

I recently attended a Quantified Self meetup on sleep, that gave me the kick up the arse I've been needing. (Which was only compounded when I heard about Pebble closing, and that Fitbit would take over their servers, and staff.) One of the presenters talked about how he got his Fitbit data and how he analysed it. (If you're interested, slides are here, and blog post here.) He switched to using the official APIs when they became available, but I went with his original approach, a python program to log in and get your intraday data points instead of the aggregated stuff you get on the dashboard.

I haven't been the most steady wearable user, but there were a few months when I wore it reliably. Simply because I was sleeping terribly and wanted to understand just how badly. Although I never got around to actually analaysing the data, until now. (That's one thing about all these QS talks, typically everyone showing their data is the picture of good health. I'm more interested in seeing what it looks like when it goes wrong.)

I used the website dashboard to find the months that actually contained data. Then I exported csv files, month-by-month, using the official export option. This is the aggregated information, but it will be nice to see if it correlates with the intraday info.

Then armed with dates that contain valid data, I put them into the python program, and grabbed all my data. In short, download and extract the source code. In the same folder as setup.py create your own python file, where you will create your own client. (This information is apparently in the example files, but I poked around before I noticed that.) To create your own client you just pass in your email address and password;
client = fitbit.Client.login(email="bob@example.com", password="password")
You grab the specific info you're interested in;
client.intraday_sleep(date)
And then dump it to screen/file/whatever you want. Although it's a good idea to format it a little.

Sleep data is recorded as one value per minute.

# The different values for sleep are:
# 0: no sleep data
# 1: asleep
# 2: awake
# 3: very awake

# data will be a similar list of tuples, but spaced one minute apart
# [
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 20, 23, 59), 2),
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 21, 0, 0), 1),
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 21, 0, 1), 1),
# ....
# (datetime.datetime(2010, 2, 21, 8, 34), 1),
# ]


And then, we are left with the task of analysing the data. Which is a much bigger one.
chebe: (WhoWouldHaveThought?)
2016-12-05 02:16 pm
Entry tags:

Sewing miscellaneous

No make to report this week. But the past couple of weeks I've been on an organisational binge. It started with getting the Colette Sewing Planner. It not only enabled me to collect all my projects and notes in one place (that conveniently fits in my handbag), but it also forced me to think about what it is I actually wear, and what I want to focus on.

But of course, it only lead onto other undertakings; like sorting all my patterns (upgrading to clear envelopes because I had a right pain opening up all the opaque ones when looking for the right pattern), and finally taking on sorting through my fabric stash. Every length is now measured and tagged. ... But then, I figured it would be beneficial to create my own swatch book. So I found a PDF template, customised it, and now I've sent it off to get printed on some nice card stock.

I've also ordered a bunch of needles I'm missing (like twin stretch), some nifty tools (like twin pattern wheel), and some new cases/boxes to help me tidy up my overflowing sewing box. It's a deep rabbit hole, but I think I'm close to the end. And I've rediscovered quite the collection of projects that I already have all the fabric and thread for, so hopefully I'll be able to tackle the really long list swiftly. ... Oh, ribbons and elastics! ... Tidying up, who knew it was so helpful?
chebe: (Spools of thread)
2016-11-28 11:52 am

Simplicity 1429 pull-on knit shorts

This weekend I began the journey towards trousers. I'm taking the long route, so I started with some pull-on knit shorts. Simplicity 1429, view E; long (knee-length) shorts, with acres of material. I can't quite figure out why this pattern is knit-only. Nothing stretches (except the elastic wasitband). I could have made this in a lightweight non-stretch woven and only the drape would have been affected.

Otherwise though, cute lounge shorts. There are soft pleats in the front, darts in the back, and a blind hem, of which I will only say that I need more practice. A lot more.

I also added the waistband to the wrong side, and had to unpick it. A narrow zigzag stretch stitch on a thin rayon. It took a very long time. And then, I put it back on inside out, and could not face unpicking it again. Most people don't go around inspecting each others wasitbands though, so it should be okay.

I made it in a featherweight jersey called Fushia Dakota knit, 95% rayon/5% spandex. (Which made machining the blind hem extra fun.) Comfy, light; I can see the full length trousers working well in hot weather.

Loungey )
chebe: (GirlDayDreaming)
2016-11-21 11:34 am
Entry tags:

Seamwork Oslo cardigan

This weekends make was Seamwork's Oslo; an oversized, slightly boxy, long cardigan. I made it in a Medium, and there is still oodles of room there. Definitely comfy.

I left off the buttons. And went with sleeve option 2 (the non roll-up kind) because when working with computers I find it easier to have my wrists accessory free. Although they are still long enough to cover the knuckles. I did have the seam ripper out for this one. It took me way too long to understand the cuff instructions. (Turn half inside-out to right side out.)

I made it in a nice polyester Ponte de Roma (quickly becoming my favourite fabric) with just a touch of spandex (4%). The colour is officially 'Petrol', which is like a darker, more blue teal? I'm pretty sure it will go with almost everything in my wardrobe.

Slouchy )
chebe: (Sewing Machine)
2016-11-15 03:16 pm
Entry tags:

Seamwork Aberdeen v-neck top

Seamwork's Aberdeen is a v-neck, batwing sleeve, t-shirt. The front is one piece, so no need to worry about matching patterns. The back is two pieces, and also features a v-neck, which I think is a nice touch.

I need to practice adding v-necks. There's a little bubble at the front point, and the back ones didn't quite line up. Also, because I hate hemming, I half-assed the hem with just a single turn and zig-zag stitch.

But, it's cute and comfy. I made it up in a light t-shirt weight stretch jersey. I picked up this fabric as a remnant while on holiday in Vancouver years back. The print is busy, but monochromatic, so sufficiently moody for my tastes.

Ta-da! )
chebe: (Spools of thread)
2016-11-14 03:30 pm
Entry tags:

Seamwork Manila Leggings, version two

Version one were made up in the green-blue spotty fabric. I told you you'd seen the last of that fabric, and I meant it. This version is done up in a plain plum-purple, medium weight stretch jersey. Otherwise; I tweaked the pattern to widen the calves, and take out some fabric from the stomach.

These are deliciously comfortable. The lower legs fit great. This material is less stretchy than version one, so has shown that adding a bit of length to the rear would be good as well. Next time Gadget.

Couple of pictures )
chebe: (Sewing Machine)
2016-11-13 06:20 pm

Slip Sew-Along; version two

I'm feeling a little despondent over things I have no influence over. So I'm distracting myself with blogging. Here's something I made earlier in the year.

Remember the Butterick 6031 slip sew-along? (Here's version one.) Well, I finally got around to making it up in the kit fabric and notions.

It's straight forward, easy to put together (even with the slippery fabric). The lace straps are a little fiddly, but otherwise it's a joy to make and wear.

Photos )
chebe: (WalkSign)
2016-08-15 09:32 pm
Entry tags:

4x4x4 LED Shield

You know the story; you go into Maplins for solder, and you walk out with an LED Cube Shield. (It can't be just me.) Anyway, building one of these yokes seems to have become a kind of rite of passage for the makery sort. So, I made one!

Couple of photos )



Not so straight LED Cube, completed
Photo by chebe



Pretty!
chebe: (Default)
2016-08-10 10:46 pm
Entry tags:

EMF 2016

EMF happened last weekend. I went, with some of the tog people, but not with tog. It was a really good weekend.

It's difficult for me to describe what EMF is. Because it is simply too big now. There was somewhere between 1,000 and 1,500 people, camped in one large field. With five stages, several workshop tents, villages, bars, food vendors, and a giant beanbag-filled lounge tent. Every person attending will have had different experiences, some even seeming to be from completely different events. It's large. There's a lot on. And it's utterly surreal.

If you've been to any of the maker faires, then EMF can be described (as one of the other attendees said) as a large faire, only instead of explaining your ideas and projects to regular people you're showing them off to other makers and hackers. There's a level of engagement, of enthusiasm, of sheer energy, that is difficult to gather in other places. It's a bit like a temporary Never Never Land, full of grown-up techie toys, organised and run entirely by volunteers. Large inflated bunny filled with neopixel strips that you can change the colour of by tweeting it. Really tall LED tower game. Pong made physical, with giant paddles and fire. A podium that made fire dance to music beats. Bbqs, fire pits, self tending bar robot. Amazing micropython badges. An incredible wifi network with over 64 access points, a beautiful dashboard, and nearly two terabytes of data transmitted. Electricity to your tent. Hot sunny days, clear starry nights.

Reality is proving just how hard an act EMF is to follow.

You can check out photos, and watch the talks. It will give you a flavour, but it isn't the same as being there.

An aside )

It was a replenishing weekend. Fun, energising, and completely exhausting. I want to go back.
chebe: (Default)
2016-07-06 10:55 pm
Entry tags:

When the silence becomes deafening

This post is going to be a little out of character for this blog. For one, it's an actual update (yes I'm still around), but two, it's autobiographical. This friends is the story of how I came to leave the hackerspace.

It started just over a year ago. And by started I mean it all fell off the edge of the cliff it had been tottering on and the end had begun. And by just over a year ago I mean 12th May 2015. (I know this date because I have the emails, all the emails.)

Ireland was having itself a little vote. One of the things up for public decision was a referendum to remove the distinction as to gender/sex from the articles for marriage. Basically, it was a marriage equality referendum, to allow any two people to marry, irrespective of their gender/sex. A short time previously we had gained 'civil partnership' for same-sex couples (as distinct and not equal to different-sex couples) and the sky hadn't fallen in. So it was time to push for full equality.

This was a very emotive issue. The No campaign were making a lot of noise, using scare tactics, threatening all kinds of irrelevant outcomes. Crowds of volunteers organised to travel the country advocating for marriage equality. Thousands of people told their intimate stories again and again to strangers. Essentially pleading, even begging, to be treated equally. Some well received, others not.

In order to get volunteers around the country, and to get brochures, leaflets, posters made up the Yes campaign were fundraising. Part of this was selling Yes/Tá badges, tshirts, etc. These items actually became quite coveted. Seeing a stranger wearing one in the street made you smile, feel comfortable, accepted.

I bought a big bunch of badges. I brought them to Craft Night in the hackerspace to give them away to whomever wanted one. They were eagerly snapped up, but I had many so there were some left over. I said I'd leave the extra in the Swag box (full of badges, stickers, pencils, etc from random companies and projects) for people who I knew wanted some but weren't able to make it in. And I was told that if I did they would be thrown out. I'm sorry, what? Apparently the hackerspace was to remain completely apolitical. Rather stunned and taken aback I saved my badges and redistributed them manually.

Another woman at that Craft Night later on that evening emailed the fullmembers mailing list to have a discussion that sometimes, on an individual case-by-case basis, we should take a stance.
"In particular, I'd like to see TOG as a group being pro-Yes for the upcoming marriage equality referendum. I'd like to see YES badges and leaflets available in the common room, and for NO leaflets to be unwelcome."


If you are familiar with mailing lists you'll know what happened. The ensuing shitstorm resulted in the majority of the membership saying "we don't want to be unwelcoming to No voters", or, saying nothing at all. Several members, did as the volunteers did, and opened their private lives, their soft quishy insides, to the scrutiny of the group. They asked to be seen.

It's at this point that several people will want me to point out that any group, especially a hackerspace, is not a homogeneous whole. That some peoples' opinions do not represent the group. Except, thing is, we work by Consensus. So when we decided that we'd rather protect the feelings of hypothetical potential members (who don't see their fellow human beings as equal) rather than support a significant chunk of the existing membership, it did actually speak volumes about the group as a whole. It told us that we were not welcome. That the realities of our lives were disruptive (in the bad way), and something not to be talked about in polite company. We were rejected.

On Friday 22nd May 2015 the country voted. On Saturday 23rd May 2015 the country partied. The result was 62% Yes. (Only one constituency had a majority No vote, and even that was by a tiny margin.) Nearly a 2:1 ratio. We became the first country in the world to pass marriage equality by popular vote. We were ecstatic. We were deeply, deeply relieved.

The hackerspace went on saying nothing.

Things continued on as usual. Our lease was being terminated, we had to find a new space. Then we had to do up the new space. We were also changing legal structure from a club to an actual company (one of the 16 new definitions that had just become law that Summer) with limited liability. Lots of to-ing and fro-ing, lots of discussion about direction, ethos, and internal wall layouts.

The landlord was putting in new toilets. In the old space we had two separate toilets, gender neutral. We asked one to be made wheelchair accessible. (In the end he didn't make the door wide enough.) The other he put urinals in. So now we had a Mens toilet, and an Other toilet. This did not sit well with many of the membership. But it wasn't seen as a real issue by many others. We were pushed out again.

Around this time I started being harassed by another member. (For reasons as yet unknown.) Counter to some stereotypes, and playing into others, this other member was/is female. Verbal harassment, accusations, following me, making me leave rooms, not leaving me alone as I repeatedly asked. Which several months later escalated to her trying to get me thrown out of the building for simply showing up.

You probably have guessed the pattern already. The hackerspace did nothing but bury their heads in the sand. When it escalated many months later, it made the rest of the membership uncomfortable enough that the new Board of Directors decided we should seek independent arbitration. This is a fair idea, except that in the meantime I was so scared of this person that I self-selected out of physically attending the space, expect when I knew there would be many other people there as well.

I'll never know how the arbitration would have worked out as the first session would have been next week. But that all seems a bit redundant now. Also, at time of writing, they are still discussing whether or not they need a Code of Conduct, what should go into it, if it needs to be enforceable, and how. A discussion which has been going on for over a year. They (baring a few trying to push it to happen) just don't see the need.

To wrap up this long tale, yesterday a Consensus Proposal arrived on the mailing list. Two of the Board were supporting a new member's request to have their probationary period shortened (the usual period is three months) to less than a month. I asked why. I wasn't told. I said that it wasn't fair, it looked like favouritism, and that more justification needed to be given. Mailing listness happened, and I was forced into an official objection. To many I suppose I won the battle. But that's only if you completely miss the point.

I received the most condescending email I have ever received (and there's been a few) privately from one of the Board. I realised that I couldn't deny it anymore. Despite the best efforts of a great many people over the years, despite blood, sweat, and tears, my beloved hackerspace had abandoned their own ideals and become just another boys' club. Which broke my heart in ways I didn't think possible. So I quit, with barely a peep. And the (near) silence I got in return is proof enough that I did the right thing.

I truly, deeply, desperately, hope they can turn it around, that they can make it better. But I've no energy left to fight for something it appears nobody wants.
chebe: (Default)
2016-04-13 08:27 pm
Entry tags:

DeepVR, and the search for a controller

DeepVR is this amazingly beautiful and serene underwater virtual reality that some very talented and extremely dedicated people have been working on for a while now. (It is seriously astounding, check it out if you can.) You are immersed in this other reality with the Rift, or now also the Vive. You navigate the world by controlled breathing. There isn't yet a popular controller to do this, so they have been trying various different configurations and learning from each iteration.

One such type of belt )



Finished belt outside
Photo by chebe



Apologies for the poor photos, I was so focused on finishing them that I forgot to get decent photographs. The rush was because the belts have flown off with the team to Tribeca, where they will surely be put through their paces. I look forward to finding out how they held up and what didn't work so well.
chebe: (Cyberish eyes)
2016-02-21 02:14 pm

Career Zoo, Coding Grace, and the magic that happened

Yesterday (Saturday 20th February) Career Zoo was once again held in the Convention Centre. It had a couple of themes, one of particular interest to myself; women in tech. I wasn't sure what to expect, but the powerhouse that is Coding Grace got in touch, organising a mini wearables hackathon in the middle of the whole thing. Uh, yes!

We spent the day in an indoors white-picket-fenced picnic area next to DAQRI, our generous sponsors. Playing with toys, battling software, sharing resources, talking to curious attendees, and having a great laugh.



Wearables mini hackathon picnic in progress
Photo by CareerZoo, source




Photo journey )


A huge thank you to my fellow subversive hackers; [twitter.com profile] whykay, [twitter.com profile] micktwomey, [twitter.com profile] saoili, [twitter.com profile] meaigs, [twitter.com profile] taraannosaur, [twitter.com profile] norette, [twitter.com profile] NaoimiGillis, and everyone I got to talk to during the day/night for keeping me so entertained! And Coding Grace, DAQRI, and Career Zoo, for making it happen.



Hack-ter Party
Photo by CodingGrace, source